The European Union banned neonicotinoids for the sake of saving bees. Nearly

Pesticides with a hard-to-pronounce name have no less difficult relationships with European law and bee colonies. Find out why.

Pesticides with a hard-to-pronounce name have no less difficult relationships with European law and bee colonies. Find out why.

Neonicotinoids are a small class of insecticides. With moderate toxicity to animals, they are very toxic to bees, causing intestinal upset and subsequently death. We wrote about this two months ago when scientists once again sounded the alarm and called three pesticides from the class of neonicotinoids dangerous: imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and clonidine. They have long been sold under various brand names – in the post-Soviet market, they are represented by Confidor, Tank, Golden Spark, Borey or Tabu. In 2013, the EU partially limited their use, and last week expanded the ban on the use of the three main varieties of neonicotinoid outdoors, writes Modern Farmer.

The fact is that this category of pesticides is one of the possible factors that led to a sharp decrease in the bee population in European meadows. Studies have shown that these chemicals reduce the ability of bees to lay eggs and reproduce. But the ban still leaves the opportunity to use these insecticides – albeit not already in the open. They can still be used in greenhouses if they are always closed.

In an EU statement, the effect of neonicotinoids on bees is called the main reason for the ban – and this is in addition to the pollution of soil water.

The protection of bees is an important issue for the Commission, as it is a matter of biodiversity, food production, and a clean environment – said in a statement.

The agrochemical company Bayer CropScience, which sells most of the neonicotinoid pesticides in Europe, predictably reacted negatively to this ban. In a press release, company representatives said:

  • The current decision of EU member states to limit the use of certain neonicotinoids is a bad signal for the European agricultural sector. This solution can neither protect the environment nor improve the number of bees or other pollinators. says the company.

Bayer suggested that the ban would not be as effective as “increasing the ability of pollinators” or killing a tick of the varro species, another possible reason for the collapse of bee colonies.

The EU ban will enter into force at the end of 2018.